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Portal 2
Portal2cover-1-









Portal 2 retail cover art, featuring co-op campaign characters Atlas (bottom) and P-Body (top).

Developer(s) Valve Corporation
Publisher(s) Valve Corporation
Distributor(s) Valve Corporation (online)

Electronic Arts (retail)

Director(s) Joshua Weier
Producer(s) Gabe Newell
Artist(s) Jeremy Bennett
Randy Lundeen (art directors)
Writer(s) Erik Wolpaw

Jay Pinkerton Chet Faliszek

Composer(s) Mike Morasky

Jonathan Coulton (Ending Theme: "Want You Gone") The National ("Exile, Vilify")

Series Portal
Engine Source (Build 4710, 6 October 2011)
Version 2.0.0.1 (24 October 2011)[1]
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows

Mac OS X PlayStation 3 Xbox 360

Release date(s) Retail
  • NA April 19, 2011
  • PAL April 21, 2011

Steam (Worldwide) April 19, 2011

Genre(s) Puzzle-platform game
Mode(s) Single-player, co-operative multiplayer
Rating(s)
Media/distribution Optical disc, digital distribution
System requirements
Windows
  • Microsoft Windows XP, Vista or 7
  • Intel Pentium 4 3.0 GHz or 2 GHz dual-core
  • 1 GB RAM (2 GB for Vista and 7)
  • 7.6 GB of free hard disk space
  • DirectX 9.0 graphics card with 128 MB RAM
  • DirectX 9.0c compatible sound card
Mac OS X
  • Mac OS X 10.6.7
  • Intel Core Duo 2.0 GHz
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 7.6 GB of free hard disk space
  • NVIDIA GeForce 8600M, ATI Radeon HD 2400, or Intel HD Graphics 3000

Portal 2 is a first-person puzzle-platform video game developed and published by Valve Corporation. It is the sequel to Portal (2007) and was released on April 18, 2011 for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360. The retail versions of the game are distributed by Electronic Arts, while digital distribution of the Windows and OS X versions is handled by Valve's content delivery service, Steam. Portal 2 was announced on March 5, 2010, following a week-long alternate reality game based on new patches to the original game. The sequel's release on Steam was preceded by a second multi-week alternate reality game, the Potato Sack, involving 13 independently-developed titles which culminated in a distributed computing spoof to release Portal 2 several hours early.

GameplayEdit

Portal 2 is a puzzle game presented from the first-person perspective. Players act as Chell in the single-player campaign, as one of two robots, Atlas and P-Body, in the co-operative campaign, or as a simplistic humanoid icon for community-developed puzzles. All four can move, look, and interact with the environment. The character can withstand damage for a brief period but will die under sustained injury. There is no penalty for falling onto a solid surface, even at high speed, but falling into bottomless pits or pools of toxic liquid kills the player-character immediately. When Chell dies in the single-player game, the game restarts from a recent checkpoint;[5] in the co-op game, the robot respawns shortly afterwards without restarting the puzzle.[6] The goal of both campaigns is to maneuver the character(s) through the Aperture Science facility. While most of the game takes place in modular "test chambers" with clearly-defined entrances and exits, other parts occur in behind-the-scenes areas where the objectives are less clear.

PlotEdit

Portal 2 follows the player-character Chell after the end of Portal, in which she destroys the rogue artificial intelligence construct GLaDOS that ran the Aperture Science Enrichment Center where the game is set. In Portal's backstory, Aperture Science conducted experiments to determine whether human subjects could navigate dubiously safe "test chambers", until GLaDOS killed the scientists with a neurotoxin. The ending of the first game, retroactively patched just prior to the sequel's official announcement, shows Chell being dragged away from the remains of GLaDOS by an unseen figure with a robotic voice, later identified by writer Erik Wolpaw as the "Party Escort Bot."[23] A promotional comic shows that an estranged Aperture Science employee placed Chell into suspended animation for an indefinite amount of time, in an effort to save her life.

The Portal series shares a universe with the Half-Life series. Portal takes place between Half-Life and Half-Life 2,[24] and Portal 2 is set "a long time after" its predecessor (presumably years later).

DevelopmentEdit

Portal 2 follows the player-character Chell after the end of Portal, in which she destroys the rogue artificial intelligence construct GLaDOS that ran the Aperture Science Enrichment Center where the game is set. In Portal's backstory, Aperture Science conducted experiments to determine whether human subjects could navigate dubiously safe "test chambers", until GLaDOS killed the scientists with a neurotoxin. The ending of the first game, retroactively patched just prior to the sequel's official announcement, shows Chell being dragged away from the remains of GLaDOS by an unseen figure with a robotic voice, later identified by writer Erik Wolpaw as the "Party Escort Bot."[23] A promotional comic shows that an estranged Aperture Science employee placed Chell into suspended animation for an indefinite amount of time, in an effort to save her life.

The Portal series shares a universe with the Half-Life series. Portal takes place between Half-Life and Half-Life 2,[24] and Portal 2 is set "a long time after" its predecessor (presumably years later).

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